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A-20G "Miss Pam" 1:72 Hobby Master Diecast Airplanes HA4205 IN STOCK NOW

Pacific A-20G Havoc from Hobby Master
Pacific A-20G Havoc from Hobby MasterPacific A-20G Havoc from Hobby MasterPacific A-20G Havoc from Hobby MasterPacific A-20G Havoc from Hobby MasterPacific A-20G Havoc from Hobby Master
Item #HM-HA4205
Rating
AvailabilityIn Stock
List Price$85.00
Our Price$79.99 - You Save $5.01 (6%)
Quantity

1:72 A-20 Havoc premium diecast from Hobby Master HA4205.

Douglas A-20G Havoc Diecast Model, USAAF 312th BG, 388th BS, #43-21905 "Miss Pam", New Guinea.



Length 8 inches
Wingspan 10 inches


Features:
* Premium diecast metal construction.
* Detailed panel lines, access panels and skin.
* Positionable landing gear.
* Detachable, placarded ordnance loads.
* Hand painted pilot.
* Articulating display stand.

On January 28, 1942 the 312th Bombardment Group (Light) was constituted and activated on Mar15, 1942. The 312th was re-designated Bomb Group (Dive) in July 1942 equipped with A-24, A-31, A-36 and P-40’s. Between October and December 1943 the group moved to the South Pacific assigned to the 5th AF where they once again became 312th Bombardment Group (Light) using P-40’s for escort duty in New Guinea. By February 1944 the 312th had been completely re-equipped with the Douglas A-20 Havoc and for the next 10 months attacked airfields, bridges, troops and supply depots. The 312th also took part in amphibious operations on New Guinea and Palau. The 312th were nicknamed the "Roarin' 20's" as they flew the Douglas A-20 Havoc. In November 1944 the unit moved to the Philippines. Over time the Douglas Havoc 43-21904 wore the names “Miss Priss”, “Ready Teddy” and assigned to the 388th BS / 312th BG on October 25, 1944 it was named “Miss Pam”. When WWII ended the aircraft was abandoned on Moratai in a bone yard for the next 3 to 4 years before becoming scrap.

With war approaching America knew it would be called upon to aid their Allies so a new aircraft would need to be developed. Douglas Aircraft designer Ed Heinemann’s DB-7/A-20 was chosen to be the new attack-bomber. The prototype flew in December 1938 with the first production aircraft flew on August 17, 1939. Production ran until September 1944 with 7,478 aircraft built. During WWII these were supplied to French, British, Australian, Dutch and Soviet forces as well as their own U.S. Forces.
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